Indistinguishable From Magic Avatar

29807 Notes

http://inkclaws.tumblr.com/post/93038631356/swanjolras-like-tbh-i-feel-like-my-problem-with

swanjolras:

like tbh i feel like my problem with the “dark and gritty!!” trend in modern stories is this

there’s this idea in our culture that cynicism is realistic? that only children believe in happy endings, that people are ultimately selfish and greedy and seeing with clear eyes means seeing the world as an awful place

that idealism is— easy, i guess. butterflies and sunshine and love are easy things to have in your head.

but i’ve known since i was fifteen that idealism— faith in humanity— optimism— is the most difficult thing in the entire world.

i constantly struggle to have faith in humanity, because it’s really, really easy to lose it. it’s easy to look at the news and go “what were you expecting? of course humans behave this way.” it’s easy to see the world and go “ugh, there’s no hope there.” and the years when i believed that were easy. miserable— but easy.

it is hard work to see the good in people. it is hard work to hope. it is hard work to keep faith and love and joy and appreciation for beauty in my daily life.

and when moviemakers and tv producers and writers go “omg!!! all characters are selfish and act poorly and don’t love each other, nothing ever happens that is happy or good, that’s so much more realistic, that’s so much more adult”

no, it’s not

it’s childish.

it’s the most childish thing i can imagine.

234 Notes

barn-megaparsec:

So earlier this month I made a last-minute decision to go to Anime Expo, and thought, What the heck, I’ll go as Kim Ross just for funsies, since I’m not really a huge fan of any specific anime, but really want to cosplay. Didn’t have much time to prepare anything except the arm, but still I was thinking, man, I wish I could wear contacts, and I wish I didn’t have this pale streak in the front of my hair…
After today’s update, though… the hair is fitting! 

I’m glad I could retroactively make your cosplay more accurate!

barn-megaparsec:

So earlier this month I made a last-minute decision to go to Anime Expo, and thought, What the heck, I’ll go as Kim Ross just for funsies, since I’m not really a huge fan of any specific anime, but really want to cosplay. Didn’t have much time to prepare anything except the arm, but still I was thinking, man, I wish I could wear contacts, and I wish I didn’t have this pale streak in the front of my hair…

After today’s update, though… the hair is fitting! 

I’m glad I could retroactively make your cosplay more accurate!

2758 Notes

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:
Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.
And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:
I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).
The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.
I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.
So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point. 
After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.
Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.
Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:

  1. Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
  2. Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
  3. Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
  4. Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.

And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:

I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).

The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.

I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.

So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point.

After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.

Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.

Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

30 Notes

Did Kaito make Kim's eye? Balthazar points it out as being of higher quality than her arm, which got me thinking about where it came from. Also, Leviathan's mask seems to change shape somewhat, particularly the eyes, from panel to panel. Is this just artistic liberty to show expressions, or is it actually made to change shape somehow (with dark science or otherwise)?

Asked by thomas0co

Kim made all of her own prostheses. Balthazar only comments on the quality of the eye, he doesn’t ever actually see any of her other parts. His inference that her limbs must be less human-looking ended up being correct, but just because something isn’t human-looking doesn’t mean it’s of a lower quality.

17 Notes

Since the new (and absolutely beautiful) page of Dark Science was published, I went back and read the entire storyline, paying extra attention to all the little details I'd missed before, when I hit #32. The figure in the bottom panels of the vision/dream; is it some version of Kim? I assumed so, but if it's a future version, how did she grow her upper left arm back? Or is this some sort of cyclical event that's happened before, and she's seeing the past version?

Asked by colefrehlen

It certainly looks like Kim, but who knows? As for when it’s occurring, it’s definitely the past, not the future.

17 Notes

Is Alisa Caspar aware that her son is a Dark Scientist? Also, did Dark Science originate from the Nephilim?

Asked by Anonymous

Good question! It’s a shame she was taken away before he was unmasked.

As for the origins of Dark Science, from what we’ve seen so far, the Dark Scientists themselves do seem to date as far back as the time of the Old War and the Nephilim. I’d say it’s not unreasonable to connect the two.

337 Notes

Playing the long game.

34 Notes

Assuming that Balthazar Melchior and Caspar are named after the three Kings from the Nativity, why did you decide to make them all white? Obviously Dark Science isn't going to be a 1 for 1 retelling of the story of Christ but I'm wondering what your thought process was.

Asked by theyweremonsters

Caspar is based on Ayn Rand and Melchior is based on Fritz Rasp, both for very specific reasons. The naming convention of the three magi isn’t the only thing informing the character decisions. There are people of color in DS, but those three just happen to not be among them.

I actually had initially intended to make Balthazar brown, but at the time worried that people might confuse him with Coffee Shop Guy from Hob. In retrospect, that was pretty stupid of me.

68 Notes

Do you get frustrated, after working on the same storyline for so long, that this part of the story isn't finished yet? Have you started planning/writing the next chapter in Kim's life? How far in advance do you plan these things out? Do you know how/where her story ends yet?

Asked by Anonymous

It can be incredibly frustrating. I wrote Dark Science years ago at this point. It’s specifically frustrating when I’m excited to talk about one point in the story, but I know it’s not going to be revealed for months. I haven’t explicitly planned out Kim’s “next chapter,” partly because the way Dark Science ends, the status quo is shaken a lot more severely than what happened at the end of Hob.

All that aside, once I get the Patreon up and can afford a site restructuring, I’d like to update smaller one-shot comics while Dark Science is still going on. I think that would basically be the ultimate, invincible Final Form of Dresden Codak.

359 Notes

dresdencodak:

Dark Science #33 - Light and Dark
Things do not look good.

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